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Congratulations to UPLANDS for a well-deserved win! 👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾 And don’t forget to check out our virtual gallery via @uplands.org.au if you haven’t done so already 🤩

#Repost @agencyprojects with @use.repost
・・・
🏆 People’s Choice Winner 🏆
Best Digital Twin for Arts & Culture 2023
For “UPLANDS - Art, Culture, Country”

We are excited to share that UPLANDS has won the People’s Choice for Digital Twin in the Art & Culture category! A huge thanks to everyone who voted and everyone who worked with us and helped make this project a reality.

This award not only provides our project with international recognition, but should also help to build global audiences interactions with the resource, which features over 20 regional and remote First Nations Art Centres from across Australia.

UPLANDS is a project created by @agencyprojects and funded by the Australian Government through the Restart to Invest, Sustain and Expand (RISE) program and the Indigenous Visual Art Industry Support (IVAIS) program.

@uplands.org.au @anindilyakwa_arts @babbarradesigns @bulabulaarts @durrmuarts @ernabella_arts_pukatjapottery @gapuwiyakcultureandarts @hermannsburgpotters @ikuntjiartists @manyhandsart @jilamaraartsandcrafts #kaielaarts @mangkajaarts @maningridaarts @marrawuddi @martumiliartists @milingimbiartandculture @munupiarts @spinifexarts @tangentyereartists @waringarri_arts @warlayirti_artists @yarrenyty__arltere @phoria.io @wepondr @studio.ongarato @terri_janke @matterportmedia

Image credit: Munupi Arts by @alanaholmberg

#DigitalTwinAwards
#UPLANDS
#artculturecountry
#RISEfund
#ivais
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Congratulations to UPLANDS for a well-deserved win! 👏🏾👏🏾👏🏾 And don’t forget to check out our virtual gallery via @uplands.org.au if you haven’t done so already 🤩 

#Repost @agencyprojects with @use.repost
・・・
🏆 People’s Choice Winner 🏆
Best Digital Twin for Arts & Culture 2023
For “UPLANDS - Art, Culture, Country”

We are excited to share that UPLANDS has won the People’s Choice for Digital Twin in the Art & Culture category! A huge thanks to everyone who voted and everyone who worked with us and helped make this project a reality.

This award not only provides our project with international recognition, but should also help to build global audiences interactions with the resource, which features over 20 regional and remote First Nations Art Centres from across Australia.

UPLANDS is a project created by @agencyprojects and funded by the Australian Government through the Restart to Invest, Sustain and Expand (RISE) program and the Indigenous Visual Art Industry Support (IVAIS) program.

@uplands.org.au @anindilyakwa_arts @babbarradesigns @bulabulaarts @durrmuarts @ernabella_arts_pukatjapottery @gapuwiyakcultureandarts @hermannsburgpotters @ikuntjiartists @manyhandsart @jilamaraartsandcrafts #kaielaarts @mangkajaarts @maningridaarts @marrawuddi @martumiliartists @milingimbiartandculture @munupiarts @spinifexarts @tangentyereartists @waringarri_arts @warlayirti_artists @yarrenyty__arltere @phoria.io @wepondr @studio.ongarato @terri_janke @matterportmedia

Image credit: Munupi Arts by @alanaholmberg

#DigitalTwinAwards
#UPLANDS
#artculturecountry 
#RISEfund
#ivais

In the 70’s, the homelands movement was underway. It was a Yolŋu initiative, instigated before any government support for such movements. Yolŋu cleared land for airstrips and built their own houses using timber from their land, with the help of Ŋapaki (non-Indigenous people) from the Mission. #gapuwiyakdhäwu part 5



The clan elders aspired to determine their own future, conduct their affairs according to Yolŋu law and live and raise their children on their traditional lands. Their vision was to develop sustainable, self-sufficient homelands for themselves, their families, and future generations. That vision is still strong and relevant today.

Sometime in late 1968, a meeting of the elders of the Galwinku Village Council minuted a motion for Marraŋu and Dhalwaŋu people to move back to Arnhem Bay in the Miyarrka region. The motion includes the 50 names and a date set for after Christmas in 1969.

The site the elders chose to move back to was called Bralmana (see previous #gapuwiyakdhäwu post). Yolŋu were living here and leaders like Rrapaya had an established camp there. This was the start of the establishment of Gapuwiyak township where we live and work from today.

#historyseries #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #remoteartcentre #artcentrehistory #dhawu #story #gapuwiyak #yolngucountry #yolnguart #yolnguculture #ethicalaboriginalart #traditionalart #supportingcommunities #aboriginal #indigenous #firstnations #northeastarnhemland #northernterritory #ntaustralia
... See MoreSee Less

In the 70’s, the homelands movement was underway. It was a Yolŋu initiative, instigated before any government support for such movements. Yolŋu cleared land for airstrips and built their own houses using timber from their land, with the help of Ŋapaki (non-Indigenous people) from the Mission. #gapuwiyakdhäwu part 5

•

The clan elders aspired to determine their own future, conduct their affairs according to Yolŋu law and live and raise their children on their traditional lands. Their vision was to develop sustainable, self-sufficient homelands for themselves, their families, and future generations. That vision is still strong and relevant today.

Sometime in late 1968, a meeting of the elders of the Galwinku Village Council minuted a motion for Marraŋu and Dhalwaŋu people to move back to Arnhem Bay in the Miyarrka region. The motion includes the 50 names and a date set for after Christmas in 1969. 

The site the elders chose to move back to was called Bralmana (see previous #gapuwiyakdhäwu post). Yolŋu were living here and leaders like Rrapaya had an established camp there. This was the start of the establishment of Gapuwiyak township where we live and work from today.

#historyseries #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #remoteartcentre #artcentrehistory #dhawu #story #gapuwiyak #yolngucountry #yolnguart #yolnguculture #ethicalaboriginalart #traditionalart #supportingcommunities #aboriginal #indigenous #firstnations #northeastarnhemland #northernterritory #ntaustralia

Comment on Facebook In the 70’s, the ...

Local truth telling. more please .

Say hi to new earring designs! 👋🏾

A few intricately painted bark earrings are now available on our website, as well as our usual pandanus designs (and a few less usual ones!)

These lightweight and unique pieces make a perfect gift for loved ones or just to treat yourself 🎁💐



FAQs
🌟 domestic postage are included in the price
🌟 website link 🔗 gapuwiyak.com.au/shop/jewellery/

#earrings #handmade #aboriginalart #ethicalaboriginalart #yolnguweaving #barkearrings #wovenearrings #yolnguhandmade #traditionaljewellery #indigenousart #firstnationsart #australianaboriginalart #aboriginalartists #supportaboriginalartists #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #yolngucountry👣 #NTAustralia #northeastarnhemland #nothernterritory
... See MoreSee Less

Say hi to new earring designs! 👋🏾 

A few intricately painted bark earrings are now available on our website, as well as our usual pandanus designs (and a few less usual ones!) 

These lightweight and unique pieces make a perfect gift for loved ones or just to treat yourself 🎁💐 

•

FAQs 
🌟 domestic postage are included in the price 
🌟 website link 🔗 https://gapuwiyak.com.au/shop/jewellery/ 

#earrings #handmade #aboriginalart #ethicalaboriginalart #yolnguweaving #barkearrings #wovenearrings #yolnguhandmade #traditionaljewellery #indigenousart #firstnationsart #australianaboriginalart #aboriginalartists #supportaboriginalartists #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #yolngucountry👣 #ntaustralia #northeastarnhemland #nothernterritory

Comment on Facebook 243472159133445_779384544227520

I love the new design...specially the fishbons

Let’s continue our #gapuwiyakdhäwu! Last year we started a series on the history of Gapuwiyak Culture and Arts, inviting many voices to join in the retelling of our art centre’s dhäwu (story). A lot has happened since our establishment in 2009, and although it’s a stretch to call the pre-art centre days as ‘historical’, we want to celebrate and welcome you to relive all the key milestones in our journey through this historical documentation. So here’s the 4th instalment in our story, you can catch up on the previous parts by scrolling back to September 2023 on our homepage, or heading over to our Instagram to check out the ‘Our History’ highlight bubble.

Let’s take a moment to appreciate the establishment of the Gapuwiyak township, before fast forwarding to where we left off last time in the early 2010s when the art centre opened…



In the decades prior to 1970, before the existence of Gapuwiyak, Yolŋu people in the East Arnhem region were congregated in various missions and homelands. Yolŋu people from the current-day Gapuwiyak area had travelled to Galiwin’ku on Elcho Island, or Yirrkala and Milingimbi, to see what was going on in these new communities.

The idea of establishing a community where Gapuwiyak now stands was seeded in the 1960s when the mining company BHP was bulldozing exploration roads all throughout Eastern Arnhem Land. Local Yolŋu people living in Bralmana, Burrum, Raymingirr, Rarrinya, Dhuwalkitj, Borliala and other outstations expressed concern about the desecration of their lands.

As a result, Yolŋu leaders including Wayunga, Gunbuku (1), Rrapaya, Gambitjun, and the others, supported by Rev. Harold Shepherdson (‘Sheppy’) considered building a permanent settlement in the area to declare their rights to their inherited lands.

📸: by Geoff Davey, taken in 1972, who helped set up the timber mill in the late 60’s. The photo depicts traditional style gathawuḏu (mosquito houses) in Bralmana. This type of shelter keeps dogs and other animals off the sleeping platform and by lighting a fire of ant hill mud underneath, mosquitos are also kept at bay. Some information above is also drawn from Geoff and Judy Davey’s ‘An Early History of Gapuwiyak, 1969-1975’.

#historyseries #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #remoteartcentre #artcentrehistory #dhawu #story #gapuwiyak #yolngucountry #yolnguart #yolnguculture #ethicalaboriginalart #traditionalart #supportingcommunities #aboriginal #indigenous #firstnations #northeastarnhemland #northernterritory #ntaustralia
... See MoreSee Less

Let’s continue our #gapuwiyakdhäwu! Last year we started a series on the history of Gapuwiyak Culture and Arts, inviting many voices to join in the retelling of our art centre’s dhäwu (story). A lot has happened since our establishment in 2009, and although it’s a stretch to call the pre-art centre days as ‘historical’, we want to celebrate and welcome you to relive all the key milestones in our journey through this historical documentation. So here’s the 4th instalment in our story, you can catch up on the previous parts by scrolling back to September 2023 on our homepage, or heading over to our Instagram to check out the ‘Our History’ highlight bubble. 

Let’s take a moment to appreciate the establishment of the Gapuwiyak township, before fast forwarding to where we left off last time in the early 2010s when the art centre opened… 

•

In the decades prior to 1970, before the existence of Gapuwiyak, Yolŋu people in the East Arnhem region were congregated in various missions and homelands. Yolŋu people from the current-day Gapuwiyak area had travelled to Galiwin’ku on Elcho Island, or Yirrkala and Milingimbi, to see what was going on in these new communities. 

The idea of establishing a community where Gapuwiyak now stands was seeded in the 1960s when the mining company BHP was bulldozing exploration roads all throughout Eastern Arnhem Land. Local Yolŋu people living in Bralmana, Burrum, Raymingirr, Rarrinya, Dhuwalkitj, Borliala and other outstations expressed concern about the desecration of their lands. 

As a result, Yolŋu leaders including Wayunga, Gunbuku (1), Rrapaya, Gambitjun, and the others, supported by Rev. Harold Shepherdson (‘Sheppy’) considered building a permanent settlement in the area to declare their rights to their inherited lands. 

📸: by Geoff Davey, taken in 1972, who helped set up the timber mill in the late 60’s. The photo depicts traditional style gathawuḏu (mosquito houses) in Bralmana. This type of shelter keeps dogs and other animals off the sleeping platform and by lighting a fire of ant hill mud underneath, mosquitos are also kept at bay. Some information above is also drawn from Geoff and Judy Davey’s ‘An Early History of Gapuwiyak, 1969-1975’.

#historyseries #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #remoteartcentre #artcentrehistory #dhawu #story #gapuwiyak #yolngucountry #yolnguart #yolnguculture #ethicalaboriginalart #traditionalart #supportingcommunities #aboriginal #indigenous #firstnations #northeastarnhemland #northernterritory #ntaustralia

Comment on Facebook Let’s continue our...

Such interesting information. Thankyou. Geoff & Judy Davis were guests at Alfred & Sharon Wunungmurra's Wedding at our home in Horsley Park in 2007. It was an amazing day

I worked there from 1996 to 1999 we had the woman’s centre and a radio station heaps of basket and mat weaving after gathering and dying had a sewing room to,sum of the old sawmilling gear was still around 2 old Commer Knocker trucks and John Deer and a D4 dozer there was talk in council about making a museum to show it off the windmill if still standing is the only 40 ft Comet ever built very unique.

Thanks for the history

Chezza NeneBronwyn Davey I’m not aware of mum and dad’s writings are that are mentioned in this post ‘Geoff and Judy Davey’ ‘Early history of Gapuwiyak 1969-1975’. Have you?

Interesting

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New wuḏuku (wood) carvings available on our website 🙌🏾

Wuḏuku is translated as ‘wood’ here but more specifically it means tree, or mangrove - a lightweight wood perfect for carvings, turtle harpoons and floats on a raft or fishing line.

Today we are featuring some exciting wuḏuku works, some of which are pretty rare prototypes of the usual stuff we see at Gapuwiyak… so, not sure about you, but we’re pretty excited about these! 🤩

1. Ganguri (Yam), by Dorothy Dhulparrarrawuy Marrawungu, 51 cm, Acrylic on Wood
2. Nyangura (Long-necked turtle), by Tony Marrkula, 30 × 12 cm, Acrylic on Wood
3. Bird, by Hilda Warrawilya, 22 cm, Natural Ochres on Milkwood
4. Mokuy (Spirit figure), by Wunduru Mununggurr, 25 cm, Ochre on Wood
5. Dirrmaŋa (Echidna), by Peter (Justin) Guyula, 13.5 cm, Acrylic on Wood



Link to our website 🔗 gapuwiyak.com.au/shop/carvings/
DM if you have any questions! 🫶🏾

#woodcarving #yolnguart #aboriginalart #ethicalaboriginalart #indigenousart #wuduku #yolngucarving #traditionalcraft #firstnations #gapuwiyak #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #keeptraditionsalive #keepingculturestrong #yolnguculture #yolngupower #northeastarnhemland #northernterritory #yolngucountry👣 #ntaustralia
... See MoreSee Less

New wuḏuku (wood) carvings available on our website 🙌🏾 

Wuḏuku is translated as ‘wood’ here but more specifically it means tree, or mangrove - a lightweight wood perfect for carvings, turtle harpoons and floats on a raft or fishing line.

Today we are featuring some exciting wuḏuku works, some of which are pretty rare prototypes of the usual stuff we see at Gapuwiyak… so, not sure about you, but we’re pretty excited about these! 🤩 

1. Ganguri (Yam), by Dorothy Dhulparrarrawuy Marrawungu, 51 cm, Acrylic on Wood
2. Nyangura (Long-necked turtle), by Tony Marrkula, 30 × 12 cm, Acrylic on Wood
3. Bird, by Hilda Warrawilya, 22 cm, Natural Ochres on Milkwood
4. Mokuy (Spirit figure), by Wunduru Mununggurr, 25 cm, Ochre on Wood
5. Dirrmaŋa (Echidna), by Peter (Justin) Guyula, 13.5 cm, Acrylic on Wood

•

Link to our website 🔗 https://gapuwiyak.com.au/shop/carvings/ 
DM if you have any questions! 🫶🏾

#woodcarving #yolnguart #aboriginalart #ethicalaboriginalart #indigenousart #wuduku #yolngucarving #traditionalcraft #firstnations #gapuwiyak #gapuwiyakcultureandarts #keeptraditionsalive #keepingculturestrong #yolnguculture #yolngupower #northeastarnhemland #northernterritory #yolngucountry👣 #ntaustralia